Why do you Race?

Fundraising for Race for the Cure® events in Nebraska remains open until Nov. 15, 2014

These are a few of the stories behind why we Race — to give hope, to save lives, and to find a cure.

Julie Fuqua

Julie Fuqua CNE

Julie Fuqua – 
Breast cancer survivor and New Balance honoree for this year’s Race for the Cure in Kearney, Neb.

“At 34 years old, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I will continue to fight the fight and hope others know that even though breast cancer can and is a scary thing to go through you can overcome and beat it!,” said Fuqua.

Did you know?

Five-year survival rates for early stage cancers are at 99 percent vs 74 percent when Susan G. Komen® started its work.

Lisa Wadell Smith

Lisa Wadell Smith – 39-year-old wife and mother who passed away from stage IV breast cancer in June 2014

Lisa Wadell Smith – 39-year-old wife and mother who passed away from stage IV breast cancer in June 2014

“Someday stage 4 breast cancer will not mean dying at a young age.  There is so much research and treatments are constantly changing,” noted Lisa prior to her passing.

You can honor Lisa’s memory by donating or joining her Race team here

Did you know?

Susan G. Komen® funds more breast cancer research — more than $804 million since its founding — than any other nonprofit, second only to the U.S. government.

Tisa Hardin

Tisa Hardin – Stage III breast cancer survivor and New Balance honoree for this year's Race for the Cure in Omaha

Tisa Hardin – Stage III breast cancer survivor and New Balance honoree for this year’s Race for the Cure in Omaha

“I finished treatment in April 2013…my goal is to support anyone diagnosed with breast cancer and to close the mortality rate gap between black and white women!,” notes Tisa.

Did you know?

African American women in the U.S. have a 41 percent higher death rate than Caucasian women. Susan G. Komen is working to address this issue by improving education, access to quality care and through collaboration with its community partners.

Ponca Tribe of Nebraska

Ponca Tribe of Nebraska – Grantee of Susan G. Komen Nebraska® 
Offered more than 100 free mammograms to Native American women this past year

Ponca Tribe of Nebraska – Grantee of Susan G. Komen Nebraska® 
Offered more than 100 free mammograms to Native American women this past year

“In our community, women prefer to do things together, so much of our success rate was due to allowing them to have this experience together…and in groups at (screening events) at UNMC. We would sit together and provide each other strength and support,” said Rebecca White, Tribal Health Planner, Fred LeRoy Health and Wellness Center

Did you know?

Proceeds from Race for the Cure® helped Komen® Nebraska fund more than $540,000 in grants to nine organizations during 2014 to provide education, screening and treatment support to men and women in Nebraska.